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6151 Lakeside Dr.,  Suite 2100
Reno, NV  89511

Reno Bankruptcy Attorney

Stephen R. Harris, Esq.

“Providing Financial Protection for 46 Years”

CALL US TODAY

Your Bankruptcy Attorney

It is imperative that you have an attorney to deal with the current bankruptcy laws. In almost all cases, an experienced attorney will save you at least the amount of their fees by avoiding pitfalls that you will inevitably make trying to do it yourself. Your attorney will become your direct interface with the other players in the bankruptcy process and will keep the interaction that you have with the other players to a minimum.

Insist on an experienced bankruptcy attorney, not a credit counselor, debt counselor or paralegal.

After you have settled on an attorney to handle your filing, it is important that you be candid, honest and straightforward with him. This is the only way in which your attorney can provide the best outcome for your individual circumstances. Remember, your bankruptcy attorney is not going to assist you in hiding assets or fail to disclose assets.

Once your attorney has all the facts of your specific situation, he or she will spend a great deal of time discussing whether Chapter 7, Chapter 13 or Chapter 11 is the best way for you to proceed. He or she will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each kind of bankruptcy. Therefore it is so important for you to disclose all accurate facts and circumstances of your case with your attorney.

The best method of finding a reputable, competent lawyer is through a referral. If you know an attorney who does not handle bankruptcy, ask them to recommend a specialist. They will tend to recommend someone that they respect. Ask any friends or relatives who may have filed bankruptcy about their past experience with their attorney. Go interview those referred attorneys to see what your comfort level is with them. Many times the initial consultation is free. Be sure you talk directly with the attorney that would handle your case, not an assistant or paralegal.

There are several reasons to hire a local bankruptcy specialist:

  1. Your attorney will have knowledge of the policies and procedures of your local bankruptcy court. Even though the bankruptcy law is nationwide, how things are handled, and local customs vary in each jurisdiction. Also, the state law on exemptions may dictate the guidelines of your specific case.
  2. Your attorney will help you with pre-filing guidance. He or She will point out things to do and things to avoid prior to filing.
  3. Your attorney will help you with timing issues. There are many deadlines both before and after filing that can become critical to a successful bankruptcy. Poor timing can cost you thousands of dollars. Only experience will help you avoid disastrous pitfalls.
  4. Your attorney can help you with tax issues. Regardless of when you file, the tax clock will always be ticking.
  5. Your attorney will protect you from creditor claims. Sometimes creditors will not agree with you on repayment plans, exempt property issues, fraud claims and other issues. Your attorney will know how to best shield you from these claims.
  6. Your attorney will help you determine the best kind of bankruptcy to file considering your individual financial circumstances.
  7. Your attorney will help you complete and file the bankruptcy documents and pleadings required by the Court.
  8. Your attorney will represent you at the 341 first meeting of creditors hearing and the planning for it.
  9. Your attorney will keep your filing from being denied or revoked or dismissed.
  10. Your attorney will guide you through the endless minefield of Chapter 11.
  11. Your attorney will help you propose a Plan of Reorganization that will allow you to potentially retain valuable assets, assuming the value of the assets are paid for through Plan Payments, and to hopefully to receive a discharge of all the unpaid obligations at the end of Chapter 11 Plan repayment period.
  12. Your attorney might guide you in the timing for filing, such as any potential re-payment of loans to non-insiders or insiders are beyond the applicable time limitations found in §547 of the Bankruptcy Code.
  13. Your attorney can legally assist you in legally redeploying assets from non-exempt holdings to exempt holdings.

The Bankruptcy Judge

In most cases you may never even see the US Federal Bankruptcy judge where your case is assigned. Bankruptcy Judges are appointed to 14-year terms. Most of them are well versed in the intricacies of bankruptcy law and are quite competent and conscientious. Most issues are resolved by negotiation with bankruptcy case trustees. The judges are usually called into play to make decisions over problems and disputes.  The judges may make decisions on creditor’s objections to proceedings. He will approve leases and sales requests. Their decisions can be reviewed by U.S. federal judges.

Bankruptcy Trustees

Other than your attorney, the bankruptcy trustees are the real work horses in the process. In Chapter 7 cases, the bankruptcy trustee’s primary job is selling non-exempt property and distributing the proceeds to your creditors, if there are any non-exempt properties.  In over 90% of Chapter 7 cases, there are not any assets that are liquidated, because all of them are exempt or not worth the trouble to liquidate. The trustee is compensated on a commission basis of how much money they collect and pay creditors, as directed by the Bankruptcy Code.

The trustees and their staffs will review your bankruptcy documents and pleadings and ask you questions in a 341 meeting (more later) to determine whether any assets can be sold to pay some or all your debts. He may also gather monies from tax refunds, or divorce property settlement you may have received and collect inheritances you may be entitled to collect in the six months after filing. He may also ask you about any payments or transfers of assets that are made within two years prior to your filing to see if he can recover additional monies for creditors.

The standing bankruptcy trustee’s job in a Chapter 13 case is a bit different from Chapter 7 cases. They also ask you questions about your assets and expenses. They’re trying to assess whether your repayment plan meets the court’s requirements and assess how likely it is to succeed.  Specifically, the standing trustee’s mission is to collect the monthly payments that you make under the repayment plan and distribute them to creditors.

Creditors

After your bankruptcy filing date, you probably will have very little to do with your previous creditors. Sometimes they will attend the 341 meeting, where they can ask questions on your assets and liabilities, but typically few actually do. Most contact is handled by the trustee or your lawyer. Occasionally a creditor will hire their own attorney to protect their claim, where there are substantial assets in a Chapter 13, or 7 or 11 case. After you file, all creditor’s collection activity will stop or be stayed, so you will not hear from them.

I know there is a lot of information here so my advice is to call our office at (775) 786-7600 or (775) 690-2190 anytime to set up a complimentary and confidential consultation with me at your earliest convenience. You can also visit our new business Facebook Page for more information.